Published On: Wed, Feb 26th, 2014 on 12:03 pm

Over 40’s may be unaware of potentially blinding disease

College Of Optometrists

A Leeds-based optometrist is urging people over the age of 40 to be more aware of their increased risk of developing glaucoma – a debilitating eye condition, which, if left untreated can lead to permanent blindness.

It comes after research by the College of Optometrists found that 5% of people over the age of 40 said they had not been for a sight test for at least ten years or could not recall when they last went.

Local optometrist and member of the College of Optometrists, Tim Hunter, said: “Glaucoma often has no symptoms until significant vision has been lost. This vision cannot be restored, so early detection is vital to reduce the chance of further sight loss.”

Affecting approximately 480,000 people in England, glaucoma is a group of common eye diseases in which the optic nerve that connects the eye to the brain is damaged by the pressure of fluid inside the eye.

It is symptomless in the early stages, which means people can suffer from it for a long time without even knowing.

By time and left unseen, it can result in permanent eye damage.

Mr Hunter advised: “Having regular eye examinations is a simple way to protect yourself by ensuring that if you have glaucoma it is detected as early as possible.

“This will give you the best chance of avoiding sight loss from this potentially blinding condition.”

Further information about glaucoma can be found by visiting www.lookafteryoureyes.org.

You can also call Sightline for information, support and advice provided by the International Glaucoma Association on 01233 648170.

About the Author

Hasan Faridi

- Hasan is the founder and editor-in chief of the Yorkshire Standard. A BA Hons graduate from the University of Huddersfield, he has over four years of experience in newspapers, magazines and radio.

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